Social Distancing vs Social Isolation: Maintaining relationships and setting boundaries

As our country continues to deal with COVID-19, the term ‘social distancing’ continues to pop up. Social Distance is a big reason why you are probably working from home, your kids are not at their physical school, and why so many businesses are limiting how many people are allowed inside. CDC says limiting face-to-face contact with others is the best way to reduce the spread of the virus. Basically, social distancing means keeping space between yourself and others when you are not inside your home. You have probably noticed stores placing markers or pieces of tape to keep people at least six feet apart. It is recommended to avoid groups and stay out of crowded places.

This could be particularly hard for people who consider themselves extroverted or someone who simply enjoys being out around a lot of people whether that be the mall, the beach or their favorite restaurant. If you are someone who enjoys spending time with your friends or family members, this time could also be particularly challenging. However, just because you are being asked to distance yourself that does not mean to isolate yourself from your loved ones. In fact, you should be finding other ways to talk to your favorite people as we all go through COVID-19.

 

Setting boundaries for others

Whether you consider yourself an introvert or you’re taking the CDC’s recommendation seriously, you might have to deal with family members or friends who do not take the recommendation as seriously. This is where setting boundaries can become useful according to Bertha Barrett, an Outpatient Therapist at the Youth Crisis Center. She suggests you should be clear about your concerns, especially if you’re at a higher risk of contracting the virus due to health issues. You should also take into account if you have young children or even a newborn who could be prone to getting the virus.

Even though you are keeping your distance for health reasons, that does not mean you need to cut off all communications with your loved ones. Recently, Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry called on residents to try and call somebody at 7 pm to still stay in touch while also practicing social distancing. This is not the time for someone to intentionally try to ostracize themselves and be lonely. Even though you have set physical boundaries for someone does not mean you should set emotional ones as well. Use this time to not just call a loved one but find ways to reconnect with your family as you all go through this together.

 

Setting boundaries for yourself 

Barrett says setting boundaries for yourself can help you stay mentally well by reducing stress. If you happen to live alone or you don’t have family members or friends to call at the moment, use this time to focus on yourself. She recommends limiting your time in front of the television or any screen, especially if constant updates of the pandemic makes you uneasy. If you’re working from home, Barrett says it can be easy for someone to isolate themselves from the world by diving into their work. She wants you to stick to your normal work routine and hours if possible. Barrett says it is important to know when your workday is over. While maintain a work schedule is important – she also recommends setting time aside for yourself. Barrett calls finding ways to relax and focus on both your mental and physical health important during this time.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program


The Youth CrisisCenter was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 


Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client.

 

Click to learn more about 5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships.

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5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Accepting the new normal: Working and learning from home

If we’re not already wondering ourselves, someone is probably joking about it on social media: “what day is it?”

The CDC has been keeping on an eye on the coronavirus since the beginning of 2020. The United States has seen over 300,000 cases this year and over 7000 deaths since January. The global pandemic has caused the country’s leaders including those at the state and city level to take action to do what they can to keep you safe. Some states and cities have a ‘Safer at Home’ executive order aimed at having citizens staying at home except for critical and essential services.

Setting a Routine

This means people are having to work from home and then staying home. Children are having to do their schooling from home as well. Whether we want to admit it or not, we are used to routine and structure. We have dealt with it since before we could possibly remember with our caretakers put us down for our usual nap as toddlers, the school bell ringing marking us tardy or on time for class, and to make sure we clock in and out on time for work. Humans are truly creatures of habit, and COVID-19 has seemed to disrupt our normal routines and staying at home for work and school, has become our new normal, at least for now.

Amanda Marker is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and is the Lead Outpatient Therapist at the Youth Crisis Center. She says with routines as we know it being interrupted across the glove, it’s important to re-establish routines for oneself. Marker suggests trying to make a reasonable schedule you feel you can stick to. She believes creating a routine can cut down on stress by providing structure to ‘what comes next.’ This is especially helpful for kids who are home all day when they are used to having a structure in school.

Marker says it’s important during this time to not put too much pressure on yourself. She goes on to say we are experiencing this new way of life collectively.

Time Management

Working and schooling from home can be difficult if it’s not something we are typically used to. For many of us, the boundaries of work and home life are not as clear as they were. Marker says it’s important to set reasonable limits, build in short breaks throughout the day, and find time to disengage from work.

Marker points to the Pomodoro method as a way to manage your time. It’s a technique in which you set a timer for 25 minutes and then take a five-minute break from your work or study. After four 25 minute work sessions, you are then allowed to take a 15 to 30-minute break.

Disengaging from your job or schoolwork is just as important as practicing time management. Marker recommends creating an “end of the day” ritual. This could be changing clothes to signal your workday is over, turning your work phone off or just simply closing your computer.

Designating a work from home or school space

According to research by Anja Jamrozik, a cognitive scientist, states there are five basic needs to meet to create an effective work from home space “Access to natural light, a comfortable temperature, good air quality, comfortable furniture, and a strategy for minimizing distractions.”

Everybody’s situation is different. Someone may live in a small two-bedroom apartment or have three kids who all need to their schoolwork onlineNot everyone has the opportunity to close a door and set up a desk in a spare room with natural lighting. Marker wants you to remember that it is okay if you can’t do that. Whether you’re trying to set up something for you, your kids, or the whole family the key is to create a routine and make space for it each day. Making space in your home for education shows your kids that it’s important to you and you value learning. Making space for your work helps you focus that it’s time to work and it could be your ‘getaway’ from what else is happening in the world.

Communication is also important when it comes to designating a work or schooling space. You want to limit distraction if possible. Marker says it’s important to set guidelines. If you’re working from your bedroom, close the door to signal to your family members or roommates that you are working. If you are working in an open area, you could try putting on headphones. Marker explains this could be a visual cue to others to not disturb you when you are in the zone working. She also recommends talking to those in the household ahead of time to set boundaries, guidelines, or a schedule when it comes to working from home. By doing that, everybody can help curb the interruptions.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth CrisisCenter was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client.

 

Click to learn more about 5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Talking to your kids about COVID-19

The U.S continues to talk about COVID-19 and the uncertainties it not only leaves for our country but the rest of the world. The virus has been dominating headlines and has been a part of the news cycle since the beginning of this year. At a time of calls from our nation’s leaders to social distance, it can be had for some children, regardless of age to fully grasp what exactly is happening not just in our country, but around the world.

Kim Sirdevan the President and CEO of the Youth Crisis Center says this is the time to talk with your kids about the Coronavirus. With the majority if not all public schools in the state of Florida out and doing online learning, there is a chance your child is possibly missing those valuable hours with their friends and teachers. It has come to a time where it may not be the best decision for your child to go to their friend’s house or hang out with a group of them and that can be hard to understand.
Sirdevan recommends talking with your kids and just reassure their safety at this time. You should also try to limit what they see.

“You don’t want to scare them and that’s what is happening. They are reading data and seeing numbers.”

She tells Real Country Mornings with Gary and Char, a lot of kids watch and follow the lead of their parents. Sirdevan goes on to say that if a child sees their parent navigating through this time calmly and carefully, your kids will feel more confident about what’s happening. Kim Sirdevan also wants parents to use this time to educate themselves. If your child comes to you with a question – she says parents should be able to give them credible answers. She goes on to say that if a parent doesn’t know that specific answer – then they should try to find out for their child.

Click here to listen to the full interview.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth CrisisCenter was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client. 

Click to learn more about 5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Setting aside time to check in with your child


It’s natural for parents and children to want to spend time together. However, with a busy work-life, school, after-school activities and other distractions, it could be hard to be able to set aside time to check in with your loved ones. Things happen and sometimes interactions slip through the cracks, but there are ways to make sure you do get that quality time with your loved ones.


Find a Routine


Amanda Marker is the Lead Outpatient Therapist for the Youth Crisis Center. She recommends creating an after-school plan to help not just cut down on the chaos of making sure homework is done but to create more time with your child. The after-school plan could mean your child will spend one hour doing their homework or an hour of reading with you. This also helps set expectations.


Talk With Your Child


Don’t be afraid to just pull your child aside to talk with them. Marker suggests asking them how they’re doing or asking about school. She says you should use active listening skills to understand what is going on in your child’s life. Marker wants to remind you to validate your child’s feelings, adding she believes they want you to let them know that you care about them. According to Marker, as parents, we may not be able to fully understand what is going on in a child’s life if we are not actively checking in with them or asking how they are.


Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client. Click to learn more about 5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Recognizing Love Languages with Your Family

Hopefully, it’s not a feeling or thought that crosses the mind of any child – whether or not they feel like their parents do not love them. There can be numerous things that would lead a child to have a feeling like this such as lack of affection shown by parents, unpleasant interactions, or negative thoughts. These actions don’t have to stem from all negative interactions. For example, a lack of affection shown by parents could also mean that a particular parent may not know how to appropriately show affection to their child. Another example could be something that is a part of everyday life: conflict.  

While it should not fall entirely on the child for them to understand just how much their parents love them, Outpatient Therapist Ron Bertie recommends looking at your parent’s love languages.

5 Love Languages 

According to Doctor Gary Chapman, “there are five basic love languages.” The author goes on to say that each person has a primary love language that others must learn to speak if they want that particular person to feel loved.

  • Words of Affirmation
  • Acts of Services
  • Receiving Gifts
  • Quality Time
  • Physical Touch

For either a child or parent who may be struggling with showing affection – it could help to look at your love language. If you’re able to figure out what your love language is and compare it to theirs, it’s possible there could be a plan on how to meet in the middle.

Re-evaluate Your Thinking

Another thing Bertie recommends to children who are thinking this way is to look at the way they’re thinking. He says this way of thinking should be followed by going through cognitive distortions.

“Try to figure out if it’s true or not true.”

An article on PsychCentral says, “cognitive distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn’t really true.” Mindfulness can help with this way of thinking, such as grounding techniques or even journaling can help.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client. Click to learn more about 5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Easing your child back into a routine after a break or transition

After a few weeks off from anything you do consistently, it could be difficult to get back into a routine. This could apply to taking a few weeks off from working out, returning to work after some time off, and even your kids going back to school after their winter break. When one thinks of a school – bells often come to mind. Students are put on a routine throughout the year and with extended breaks or long weekends, sometimes it can be hard for your child to get back into the groove of things. This also applies to families going through a transition such as having to move and switch schools in the middle of the school year.

 

Amanda Marker is the Lead Outpatient Therapist for the Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program. She says there are multiple ways to help your child ease back into a routine after an extended break or transition.

 

Sleep

 

Marker suggests starting off with ensuring your child is getting enough sleep. She says making sure kids are well-rested could help them be better prepared to learn in the morning. You can help your child find their sleep routine by doing several things.

 

“Laying clothes the night before could really cut down on some of the chaos in the morning.”

 

Marker also recommends cutting down on electronics before bed. She doesn’t give a direct suggestion but says it should be up to the family to decide how long before bed to take away electronics from kids.

 

At-Home Life

 

Setting up a homework station is also something Marker suggests. Having an area dedicated to homework and backpacks can help ensure things do not become lost in the mix. If a child is working on a long-term project – it can stay there in the homework station rather than getting moved from room to room.

 

This also goes along with having an after-school plan, according to Marker. For example, if part of the after-school plan means spending 1 hour at the homework station, that helps promotes the child sticking to a routine and doing their schoolwork. Marker says this also helps with setting expectations.

 

Validation

 

A tip Marker really wants to make gets across is validation for your child. She says interruptions in their routine, environment, and expectations whether planned or random can cause anxiety and uncertainty. She says it’s important to check in with your kids and talk about school to just get a feel about what going. Marker also wants you to make sure your kids know that you do not expect perfection from them – just that they do their best.

 

 

 

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Moving Away from Negative Thoughts

Negative thoughts are not helpful thoughts. Negative thinking rarely gets us to the things we desire the most. These thoughts can be anything negative in your mind that gives you a feeling you do not value from. Once you have these thoughts, it could be hard to move away from.

 

Ashton Crawford is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and the CINS FINS Program Manager at the Youth Crisis Center. She says there are a handful of ways people can move away from negative thoughts as you take the journey to feel better about yourself.

 

Recognition

 

According to Crawford, her first step to moving away from negative thoughts is recognizing you are having those kinds of thoughts. 

 

“A lot of times, people aren’t even aware of it.”

 

She says these negative thoughts can stem from worrying about a situation, an event in the past, or something that hasn’t happened yet. Crawford believes once someone acknowledges they have a negative thought, that move can help build the foundation for finding the strength to move away from it. Crawford explains this step is important because it allows someone to come to terms with that thought. She says that helps you realize you have control over these thoughts at the end of the day.

 

Making a Choice

 

After recognizing your negative thought, Crawford recommends the next step you take is to make a choice.

 

“You can replace them with a positive thought or you can ignore it and let it fester. But, it’s going to come out one way or another.”

 

She says it all goes back to choosing what you want to do with those negative thoughts. If you wish to replace it, she also recommends trying to get out of whatever situation that is allowing you to have these kinds of thoughts. You can do this by changing your environment or the people you surround yourself with.

 

Think About It

 

It’s also suggested to think about how you’re feeling and how the negative thought impacts you.

 

“How it impacts your life, how it impacts your behavior and your emotions. All of that comes into play”

 

Crawford says once you’re able to acknowledge the negative thought, evaluate how it impacts your life, you are then able to make that choice to decide whether you want to change it.  

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

The Importance of Setting Boundaries During the Holidays

Many expectations come with the holiday season. It can be the potlucks at your work, coworkers setting up a gift exchange, close friends planning get-togethers, and spending time with family both near and far. During this time of the year, it can be easy to overschedule or get overwhelmed. There could be times when a person will have to learn to say “no,” to participate in such events. 

Desiree Patrick is the Lead Residential Therapist with the Youth Crisis Center, and she says setting boundaries can be beneficial. According to Patrick, setting boundaries can help those who may find certain topics triggering. It can also help if they had family members who were involved or has contributed to a sort of trauma in their lives. Patrick says this also applies to kids in regards to sexual abuse by family members.

“It may be very important to set boundaries due to that trauma. Especially when that stems from family members not believing them or being upset with them for revealing that information.”

When it comes to setting boundaries for children, Desiree Patrick says it’s just as important to set boundaries for them as well. Patrick touched on the yearly reminder from the Girl Scouts when it comes to forcing physical contact. 

“You never want to put your child or any child in a position where they are uncomfortable. I believe that can be damaging especially if something has happened.”

Patrick recognizes that it can be viewed as disrespectful if a child does not want to be around certain people. She says we need to realize kids are people too. Patrick says sometimes parents forget kids have feelings and sometimes they do not want to be included in situations. Patrick recommends talking with your child and asking them why they are uncomfortable. It could be a handful of things such a child being shy or something that has happened and the parent is not aware of.

The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program

Are you concerned about relationship issues with your child or between family members? The Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to children as young as 3, as well as their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling services regardless if their child is a YCC client. 

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Staying on top of your mental health this holiday season

The year is coming to a close and the holiday season is upon us. Some people look forward to spending quality time with family and friends through a handful of social events while others may dread this time of the year. Those feelings could be due to stress, anxiety, depression, or several other factors in their lives. Someone could be stressing over money to make sure their family has something to open up this year. Another person could be stressing out as they try to fit in every single social event they were invited to. Whether someone falls into one of those categories or something completely different, there are several ways to stay on top of your mental health this holiday season.

 

Danielle Masters, a Licensed Intake Clinician and Outpatient Therapist at the Youth Crisis Center says mindfulness, boundaries, budgeting, and self-care are good places to start when it comes to your mental health.

 

Mindfulness

 

“Remember to breathe,” Masters wants to remind everyone as the holidays get closer. She says it is easy to “get lost” around this time of the year. Masters suggests remembering to be present. She says the key is to focus on one thing at a time rather than channeling all of your energy into worrying about upcoming events, future preparations or memories from the past. She recommends trying to enjoy the time you have with your kids, family, friends and the present experience of togetherness.

 

Boundaries

 

This time of year can sometimes be associated with a long list of family members to visit, work functions, or events with your friends. Masters says holidays often bring a lot of “obligations” that can add more stress for both the parent and the child. She says this is the time to make that you are not overbooking or overscheduling. Especially during the holidays, Masters wants to assure people that it is okay to say no. She says learning to manage your stress as well as practicing assertive and respectable communication can also influence your kids to learn how to do the same.

 

Budgeting 

 

With stores constantly announcing various holiday deals the pressure to get everything on a wish-list can be stressful for some. Whether the item you want is on sale or not, Masters says it’s okay not to overspend on gifts. “The holidays are a perfect time to spend quality time with your children and enjoy togetherness,” as she suggests playing games instead, or starting a new holiday tradition. Masters suggests that parents set expectations upfront about gifts or holiday activities depending on the age of their kids. She adds this can be used as a method to explain to them the value of responsible spending as well as showing them that some of the most treasured gifts are those that do not require a lot of money.

 

Self-Care

 

Parents and Caregivers may have their own needs and mental health problems they are dealing with or may experience more stress around the holidays. Masters says this can be due to any losses, demands of regular work, kids and home life. According to Masters, parents need to take care of their physical, spiritual and emotional needs as kids are often affected by the well-being of their parents or caregivers.” Remember, it is okay to ask for help.”

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Dealing with Holiday Stress in the Workplace

The holiday season is now in full swing, and some people are probably counting down until their long weekend or the vacation they have been waiting all year for. The end of the year can also signal a race to the finish line, as employees work to meet their deadlines to get everything done before the New Year. During this time, employees might try to juggle different projects at once or work overtime to make sure their deadlines are met. Workers could find themselves dealing with stress and burnout in the workplace if they try to add more tasks than they can handle. 

There are several ways to keep your holiday stress in check at the workplace, as you try to avoid burnout. 

Kristen Wendle, the Director of Human Resources at the Youth Crisis Center has three tips for workers on how to avoid burn out during this time. 

Prioritize

Wendle says she wants employees to prioritize and organize their work. She says this is important because the end of the year does typically bring projects and deadlines.

“With the holiday season already being a stressful time for many, let’s encourage a more de-stress work approach and ask that employees prioritize and communicate realistic and unrealistic deadlines.”

She explains not all projects and positional responsibilities require things to be finished before the clock strikes midnight on January 1st. Wendle also encourages staff to talk with their supervisor and set a realistic deadline to get projects done by. For tasks that need to be completed during this time of the year, Kristen Wendle recommends taking a morning or afternoon to map out the next five weeks. This time can also be used to set goal dates for each week. This is a habit that can also benefit work-life but also someone’s personal life.

Personal Time

Director of Human Resources at YCC, Kristen Wendle strongly encourages employees to take some personal time. Holidays not only bring stress but can impact anxiety and depression levels. Wendle says it’s very important for employees and staff to slow down and take time to focus on themselves.

“If everyone is always going 100 mph, people aren’t putting enough focus on themselves to take a break, relax, and address anything that is going on internally.”

 

It’s a suggestion Outpatient Therapist Ronville Bertie also agrees with. If taking time off is not possible, he recommends making the most out of a lunch break. 

“It is essential to leave the office environment at lunch to rejuvenate.” 

Going back to Kristen Wendle’s first point about prioritizing, Bertie says keeping up with tasks is necessary, especially if someone is taking time off for the holidays. He explains it is best to keep up with your work, so you’re not swamped when you return. By prioritizing, employees are also able to get the most out of their time off; without worrying about work and can use that time to create memories with family and reconnect.

Say the Word ‘No’

One of the last things Wendle wants employees to take to heart is to not over-commit during this time of the year. She says this goes along with her first point, about prioritizing and organizing the coming weeks. 

“Saying ‘no’ is sometimes healthy.”

This doesn’t just apply to the workplace, it is important to not overcommit financially to holiday spending. This can also be applied to overcommitting socially, such as going to parties and taking trips. Human Resource Director Kristen Wendle, says employees can limit their chaos by saying “no” when they want to. 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program 

Founded in 1974 as Florida’s first runaway program, Youth Crisis Center has grown to one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. YCC’s emphasis on care is for those who have been exposed to traumatic situations such as divorce, homelessness, relocation, loss of life, bullying and abuse. YCC provides a variety of services for children, adolescents, young adults, parents, and families. 

The Outpatient program at the Youth Crisis Center provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as 3-years-old and their families. Parents may receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at the Youth Crisis Center. 

 

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships