Your Child and Anxiety

Everybody deals with anxiety differently. According to Healthline, “anxiety is your body’s natural response to stress.”  Stress is a part of everyday life. Some people encounter it at one point whether it’s the first day of school, public speaking, or finally landing a job interview; stress happens and how people deal with it varies. However, while stress is a part of everyday life, it is not supposed to dictate your life. Experts at Healthline claim “if feelings of anxiety are extreme, last longer than six months, and interfering with your life, you may have an anxiety disorder.”

The CDC says children also have fears and worries. Regardless of how young they are, children sometimes find themselves feeling sad and hopeless every now and then.  It is a part of life and some of those feelings are normal for kids.  However, the CDC believes “persistent or extreme forms of fear and sadness could be due to anxiety or depression.”  

 

Your child and anxiety

Parents never want to see their child suffer or be in pain. You may feel that it is your duty as a parent to help your child work through what’s bothering them. It can be easier to figure out why your child is crying if you see them with a scraped knee or if they accidentally touched the stove while it was hot. It may not be as easy to figure out what’s going on mentally and causing your child stress or anxiety.

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe there are three different categories parents should pay attention to if they suspect their child may be struggling with stress or anxiety.

Thinking symptoms

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center encourage you to really pay attention to what your child says about their thoughts. Some things to look out for is if your child often talks about their mind racing or the fact they find it hard to think straight. Therapists also recommend talking with your child’s instructors if they’re in school to see if your child’s concentration is not where it used to be or if they have difficulties with starting assignments.

Emotional symptoms

Parents should also monitor their child’s behavior and how they are reacting to things around them. You can use this opportunity to see if your child is coming off as withdrawn and if they tend to isolate themselves. You can also try talking to your kids, see if they’re having obsessive thoughts they can’t seem to shake or they are struggling with low self-esteem.

Physical symptoms

As mentioned earlier, physical symptoms are a bit easier to detect than the symptoms kids are dealing with mentally. YCC therapists claim that children undergoing stress and anxiety may have sore muscles. Children may also use the bathroom more frequently. YCC suggests to parents that they should pay attention to their children’s eating and sleeping habits. Hoarding food or having problems sleeping could also be indicators of stress for your child.

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control, or problem-solving skills. 

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 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

Mindfulness: How to get your child involved

 

Mindfulness is a subject addressed often at the Youth Crisis Center. Experts at YCC believe that mindfulness is having awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgement on ourselves. YCC wants to remind everyone that practicing mindfulness doesn’t cost anything. You will be able to practice anywhere as long as you have the time and space for it. This includes youth. Therapist at YCC encourages parents to find opportunities to talk about mindfulness with their children and how they used it today.

Getting Youth Involved

Young people should absolutely consider practicing mindfulness. Research shows that practicing mindfulness has been shown to improve attention and reduce stress.  Practicing mindfulness could also improve your ability to regulate emotions and feel compassion along with empathy.  Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe that learning how to gain and utilize self-awareness is such a valuable skill that will stick with children for the remainder of their lives. They believe self-awareness and healthy coping could have a positive impact on your mood, self-esteem, social interactions, your relationship with others, and your quality of life.

Therapists recommend practicing mindfulness as a family. They suggest it could be a great way to connect with one another. It is advised to introduce exercises when things are calm and  your child is already in a good space. It is recommended you keep the time short, especially if your child is on the younger side. It’s best to let them set the pace and once they’re done…don’t push it.

For activities, you can start with a walk or breathing exercises with your child. Once you have completed that activity, you can shift your focus to the senses. You can talk about what you saw while on the walk, the sounds, and the smells.

Mindfulness as an Adult vs Youth

Children and adults face different challenges in today’s society, and therefore children and adults may practice mindfulness in varying ways and for varying reasons. An adult may use mindfulness techniques to help them be a better leader, to help them feel better about themselves and learn gratitude, or to help them be a more effective/empathetic/well rounded person in general. Youth could use mindfulness to help alleviate behavioral and emotion regulation problems in the classroom, or to assist in coping with depression or anxiety.

 

 

Mindfulness is a subject addressed often at the Youth Crisis Center. Experts at YCC believe that mindfulness is having awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgement on ourselves. YCC wants to remind everyone that practicing mindfulness doesn’t cost anything. You will be able to practice anywhere as long as you have the time and space for it. This includes youth. Therapist at YCC encourages parents to find opportunities to talk about mindfulness with their children and how they used it today.

Getting Youth Involved

Young people should absolutely consider practicing mindfulness. Research shows that practicing mindfulness has been shown to improve attention and reduce stress.  Practicing mindfulness could also improve your ability to regulate emotions and feel compassion along with empathy.  Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe that learning how to gain and utilize self-awareness is such a valuable skill that will stick with children for the remainder of their lives. They believe self-awareness and healthy coping could have a positive impact on your mood, self-esteem, social interactions, your relationship with others, and your quality of life.

Therapists recommend practicing mindfulness as a family. They suggest it could be a great way to connect with one another. It is advised to introduce exercises when things are calm and your child is already in a good space. It is recommended you keep the time short, especially if your child is on the younger side. It’s best to let them set the pace and once they’re done…don’t push it.

For activities, you can start with a walk or breathing exercises with your child. Once you have completed that activity, you can shift your focus to the senses. You can talk about what you saw while on the walk, the sounds, and the smells.

Mindfulness as an Adult vs Youth

Children and adults face different challenges in today’s society, and therefore children and adults may practice mindfulness in varying ways and for varying reasons. An adult may use mindfulness techniques to help them be a better leader, to help them feel better about themselves and learn gratitude, or to help them be a more effective/empathetic/well rounded person in general. Youth could use mindfulness to help alleviate behavioral and emotion regulation problems in the classroom, or to assist in coping with depression or anxiety.

 

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control or problem-solving skills. 

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

Three ways you can start practicing mindfulness today

There is no universally recognized definition of mindfulness; however, there are some consistent key concepts. Mindfulness is focusing one’s attention on our present condition. It is gaining awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and sensations we experience in the here-and-now, rather than on past adversity or future anxieties. According to therapists at the Youth Crisis Center, mindfulness is having an awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgment on ourselves.

YCC therapists believe someone can begin their mindfulness journey by utilizing grounding strategies from three categories: mental, physical, and soothing.

 

Mental 

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center recommend that you try describing what’s around you. It is advised to spend a few minutes taking in your surroundings and noting what you see. Therapists encourage using all five senses during their exercise.

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center also suggest that you do something that brings you joy or makes you laugh. You can do this by watching your favorite TV show, movie or even scrolling through clips on social media.

 

Physical 

It is recommended to try to pick up or touch things near you. YCC wants you to ask yourself questions about the item, such as whether it is soft or hard or cool to touch. Therapists want you to focus on the texture and the color of each item. They also challenge you to tap into your creativity by naming specific colors like crimson or lavender instead of red and purple.

Therapists also want you to focus on your breathing. If that is something you find difficult to start, they suggest slowly inhaling and then exhaling. Saying or thinking “in” and “out” with each breath could also be beneficial. YCC encourages you to feel each breath filling your lungs and note how it feels to push it back out.

 

Soothing

When it comes to soothing, it is recommended you practice self-kindness during your mindfulness practice. You can use self-affirmations that make you feel good and powerful.

You can also visualize your favorite place. It’s recommended that you use your senses during this exercise. Close your eyes and visualize one of your favorite places to be. Think or say out loud the colors you see, the sounds you hear, or the smells coming to mind.

 

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Taking care of your mental health at work, avoiding burnout

It can be easy for one to get caught up in work. Someone could find themselves so wrapped up in their work that they probably miss lunch, stay late, or even bring their work home. Sometimes it happens to the best of us, but it could lead to workplace burnout when it happens consistently.

What is workplace burnout?

 

According to Mayo Clinic, “job burnout is a special type of work-related stress.”  Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe racing thoughts, an inability to focus, headaches, or even agitation could be stress indicators. The Mayo Clinic even suggests you asking yourself several questions:

 

  • Have you become irritable or impatient with co-workers, customers, or clients?
  • Do you have a hard time concentrating?
  • Do you drag yourself to work and have trouble getting started?

 

Similar to your physical health at work, there are ways you can take care of your mental health while at your office. Some people enjoy standing up at their desks or taking frequent walks to keep their body for their physical health. For your mental health, taking small breaks that do not fully distract you from your work and stepping away from your desk to take a quick walk could be beneficial. Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe this is just one of the many ways you can take care of yourself and avoid burnout while on the job.

 

Prioritize

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe prioritizing can be beneficial. Human Resources Manager Kristen Wendle recommends communicating with your supervisor about setting realistic deadlines. She also suggests setting a to-do list to keep organized where you can map out what needs to get accomplished when it’s due and how you plan to achieve the task. If you’re able to prioritize your tasks, it could make it easier for you so you’re not stressing over many different projects all due at one time.

 

Personal Time 

If you have some PTO saved up, it is recommended that you use it when you need it. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center encourage workers to take days off even when they’re not sick or have an appointment. Taking mental health days is just as important as staying home from work because you’re sick. Human Resources Manager Kristen Wendle says, “if everyone is going 100 mph, people aren’t putting enough focus on themselves to take a breath, relax, and address anything that is going on internally.” Taking time off from work could not only help someone bring down stress, but it could also help them in the long run at work by being able to spend time away from it to recharge.

 

Leave Work at Work

This tip goes well with the previous ones. You don’t want to bring work home unless you have to. If you’re constantly bringing work home, it could blur the lines between the office and your personal space. During the work-from-home orders, therapists recommended having a set space at your home dedicated to work. It would be best if you didn’t focus on work when you’re outside of that space or focus on home while you’re there. Having boundaries can be very helpful in this case, so focus on work while doing work things free of distractions and interruptions. However, if you don’t have boundaries and cannot create a space for work at your home, you may find it constantly on your mind or worrying tasks that can wait until the next time you’re working. This could put a strain on mental health, but it could also impact relationships because it may keep you away from your loved ones.

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

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3 things you can do now to help free yourself from negative thoughts

Nobody wants to think about unhappy or negative things, but for some people, it’s all they seem to think about. It can be frustrating to be boggled down with these types of thoughts and some may even feel betrayed by their mind playing tricks on them. These thoughts do not have to haunt your everyday life. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say there are three things you can do now to start your journey on feeling better about yourself.

  1. Recognize the negative thoughts you are having.

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say the first step could be recognizing that you are having negative thoughts in the first place. It could be the type of situation where may not even be aware that they are having negative thoughts. These types of thoughts can stem from worrying about an upcoming event, something that happened in the past, or anticipating something that hasn’t even happened yet.

Acknowledging you’re having negative thoughts, could help build the foundation for finding the strength to move away from it. Therapists claim this step is important because it allows someone to come to terms with the fact they are having negative thoughts. Coming to terms with said thought, could then help someone realize they have control over their thoughts at the end of the day.

  1. Making a choice

 

Once you’re fully able to recognize you’re having a negative, the next step one could take is to make a choice to either replace the thought in question. Therapists say you can either replace the negative thought with a positive one or let it fester. However, no matter the choice you choose the thought is coming to come out one way or another.

 

If you choose to replace the thought with a positive one, it is suggested you get try to get out whatever situation is allowing you to have these kinds of thoughts. You can do this by changing your environment or the people you surround yourself with.

 

  1. Think about it

 

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center suggest that you think about how some of your negative thoughts impact you. From there, they want you to focus on how this particular thought impacts your life, behavior, and emotions because all of that comes into play. Once you’re able to acknowledge your negative thought – you can then evaluate how it impacts your life. Therapists claim after those two steps, you are then able to make the decision on whether or not you want to change something about your negative thoughts.

 

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

4 categories to focus on when practicing self-care

 You can’t pour from an empty cup is a phrase often said when giving advice. It can be hard to help someone when you are running on empty yourself. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe you must practice self-care regularly to take care of yourself properly. They suggest there are four categories to focus on to take the appropriate steps to self-care.

 

Your work life

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say work/life balance is a must. Working is a big part of a lot of people’s life. For some, it can be their time away from home, their passion, or the job they need to do to provide for themselves and their family. It is essential, though, to leave work at work. Bringing work home when you do not need to can strain your mental health and home life. Staff should use their PTO, vacation, or sick days when necessary. You shouldn’t feel bad for taking some days off every now and then.

 

Taking care of your mind

While it may sound easy, it could be a lot harder than you may think for some. Taking care of your mind is a full-time job that you must do on a regular basis. Therapists say there are plenty of ways to take care of your mind. You can journal your thoughts or keep a gratitude journal. These activities can also help you be more present. Finding a positive outlet can also help you take care of your mind, such as exercise, art, music, or any other type of hobby. Therapists recommend finding an outlet to help keep negative feelings away by focusing on something positive. Talking to someone can also help with this. This can be a friend or a family member you trust and feel comfortable sharing details with or just having a conversation. You can also speak with a therapist or counselor if you feel necessary.  

 

Taking care of your physical body

This may sound like another no-brainer, but it’s a big part of self-care. We only have one body and it is our job to take care of it for the rest of our lives. YCC recommends staying on top of a morning or night routine, which includes taking a shower or bath, washing your hair, making sure you’re eating your meals and taking your vitamins, as well as brushing your teeth. These could be things you already do multiple times a day, but therapists suggest you stick with this routine regardless of how you’re feeling to make sure you are meeting your basic needs.

 

Setting boundaries 

Setting boundaries can mean a lot of different things to different people. It can mean only hanging out with a particular group of friends when you’re feeling a certain way or skipping over a family dinner for the sake of your mental health. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say guidelines should be viewed as guidelines, rules, or limits that a person can create to teach them acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Click here to learn more about setting healthy boundaries.

 

While this list doesn’t include every single thing you need to do to practice self-care, it’s a good starting point if you’re unsure what to do. You may already do plenty of other things that work for you, while some items on this list may not. Self-care is different for everybody, but everybody should be mindful of it so they can take care of themselves.  

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

One of the several programs YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Shining a Light on National Youth Violence Prevention Week

During the month of April, the National Youth Violence Prevention Campaign is recognized for one week. This year, National Youth Violence Prevention Week takes place April 12 – April 16th.  Around 200,000 homicides occur annually worldwide among youth between the ages of 10-29. According to the World Health Organization, that makes up 43% of the total number of global homicides each year. For those who are lucky enough to survive a violent attack, most will require hospitalization and be affected by lifelong psychological damage.

The goal of the weeklong National Youth Violence Prevention initiative is to raise awareness to educate students, school staff, parents and the general public on effective ways to prevent or reduce youth violence in communities across the country.

Deferment Programs vs. Arrest Records

Jacksonville, Florida, is working to reduce youth violence by intervening at the earliest sign a youth may be in trouble. The deferment program, called the Civil Citation Program, is offered through the Fourth Judicial Circuit for qualified juvenile offenders.

The Civil Citation Program allows law enforcement and juvenile justice stakeholders to issue a citation to qualified juvenile offenders to join the program rather than being arrested and entering the criminal justice system. The purpose of this program is to increase public safety by assessing and referring at-risk, qualified juvenile offenders to intervention programs while also reducing recidivism.

Signs an Individual May Be At Risk for Youth Violence

  • attention deficit, hyperactivity, conduct disorder or other behavioral disorders
  • involvement in crime
  • early involvement with alcohol, drugs and tobacco
  • low commitment to school and school failure
  • unemployment
  • exposure to violence in the family

Teen Court Holds Teens Accountable  

After a teen is issued a civil citation, it’s forwarded to the Court Administration Teen Court Director and reviewed to determine which curriculum, under the Civil Citation Program, is most appropriate for that youth. From there, the case will be handled by the Teen Court or one of Jacksonville’s Neighborhood Accountability Boards. Youths are then held accountable for their crimes and are required to complete community service hours and other sanctions that could include individual and family counseling, early intervention, letters of apology or academic monitoring.

This program promotes accountability, immediate intervention and prompt consequences for the qualified juvenile offenders. “This expanded program provides swifter accountability and intervention through smart justice –  a benefit to juveniles and taxpayers alike,” said Melissa Nelson, State Attorney for the Fourth Circuit.

Youth Crisis Center Provides Diversion Opportunity

The diversion programs offered by YCC can be completed either through its Outpatient Behavioral Health program or Residential Crisis Care program. Throughout six different programs, YCC provides short-term crisis care, mental health counseling, family therapy, and transitional living services for young adults. “The Youth Crisis Center has been a readily accessible resource for the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office (JSO) for many years,” said JSO Assistant Chief Adam Pendley. “The services that YCC offers enhance law enforcement efforts by getting to the root cause of what influences youth violence, and transforms their lives by providing them with the help and intervention at an early age.”

Taxpayer Savings

The Civil Citation Program saves taxpayer dollars by producing cost-effective outcomes. Rather than arresting troubled youth, the Civil Citation Program works to identify and address the causes of their misbehavior and enacts disciplinary actions that will discourage them from completing future offenses. Upon successful completion of the requirements of the Civil Citation Program, there will be no arrest on their record.

The Civil Citation Program is important because it prevents life-long consequences associated with juvenile arrests, adjudication, or convictions. “Arrest and prosecution are a first thought for many who consider ways to fight violent crime, but it’s important to remember that arrest for some may do more harm than good,” insists Pendley. “These types of diversion programs, like the Civil Citation Program, still hold the offenders accountable, but in a more proactive way that helps them long term.”

Click to learn more about the Youth Crisis Center’s involvement with the Civil Citation Program.

Are you dealing with a crisis or unmanageable youth? The Youth Crisis Center’s Residential Crisis Care program provides short-term residential services and therapy for youth ages 10-17. Our residential therapists work with youth and their families to address the immediate crisis and help provide long-term solutions to handle future concerns once the youth return home. Click to fill out the Residential Crisis Care form on our website and a therapist will contact you, or call our crisis hotline at (904) 725-6662 to speak with someone immediately. Click more to learn about 8 ways to help your child cope with stress and anxiety.

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8 Ways to Help Your Child Cope With Stress and Anxiety

How the Youth Crisis Center is helping young adults in Northeast Florida

 

Just because the word Youth is in our name does not mean we are only limited to helping children. The Youth Crisis Center offers counseling services to people of all ages. We provide residential services as well. Nearly a dozen young adults in Northeast Florida call YCC home, thanks to our Transitional Living Programs in Clay and Duval counties.

 

Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program 

Our Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program offers residential services for young adults 18-21 in Northeast Florida. Touchstone is not a “one size fits all” program; YCC considers each resident’s individual needs. Our goal is always the same for each client: to help them successfully transition into a responsible, independent young adult.

Staff at YCC work with Touchstone clients regularly through counseling services or just checking in on them to ensure everything is okay. Our clients are encouraged to have a job or be in school during their stay to help them achieve independence. In some cases, our clients are both working and going to school. If a client is not working or in school, we help connect them to programs and additional resources that could lead to employment. Our staff will also drive clients to job interviews and fairs if needed.

 

Touchstone Village provides each resident with:

  • Rental of either an individual apartment (Duval County) or a shared living space (Moosehaven Clay County) for a nominal fee 
  • Life skills training
  • Education planning
  • Career development
  • Vocational training
  • Counseling
  • Financial literacy
  • Social & personal skills training
  • Life coaching
  • Case management

To learn more and to talk to someone about the Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program, click here. 

 

House of Hope

The House of Hope is the latest addition to the list of programs at the Youth Crisis Center. The House of Hope serves as an emergency shelter for young adults 18-24 years old. 

During their stay, staff will help residents with the following:

 

– Life skills training – Connection for stable and permanent housing

– Mental health counseling – Academic monitoring and support

– Access to medical care – Career development training

 

The House of Hope includes nine rooms hosting one bed each, a full kitchen, dining hall, private counseling room, life skills training space, sanctuary garden, and communal gathering space. Each room of the House of Hope is furnished and decorated, all thanks to donors. 

The House of Hope is a gender-neutral emergency crisis shelter, with the specific services targeted to homeless young adults. That model is based on the programs YCC already offers on campus, like the Residential Crisis Care Program, which serves minors, and the long-term housing program called Touchstone Village, surviving 18-21-year-olds.

To learn more about or to talk to someone about the House of Hope, click here. 

 

If you know of a young adult between the ages of 18 – 21 who is struggling to become self-reliant and independent, YCC can provide transitional living services through our Touchstone Village program. Click to learn more about Touchstone Village and the 5 Skills Young Adults Need to Successfully Live Independently

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5 Key Skills Young Adults Need to Successfully Live Independently

Getting through the holidays while feeling lonely

The holiday season can mean a lot of things to different people. Some may think about joy, time with the family, and just happiness in general. Others may not have such a positive experience with the holidays. Both feelings are valid and are okay for someone to have. If someone has a positive experience with the holidays and tends to feel great during this time of the year, then they may not have a hard of a time as others who tend to feel lonely during these days.

On top of the general feeling of being lonely, our country is still pushing through a pandemic. The pandemic could be preventing families from gathering like they used to. There are video calls, zooms, and other alternatives it still may not be enough for those who cannot physically be with their loved ones.

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe there are ways to get through the last hump of this holiday season even if you’re feeling lonely.

Stay Busy

Carl Keller, a Family Link Therapist says it’s best to stay busy during this time. This necessarily doesn’t mean to keep yourself busy by adding more work to your plate. You can pick up a new hobby, exercise, or do something else that keeps you busy and makes you happy. Keeping yourself busy could help you with keeping your mind off of negative thoughts. These activities could also serve as healthy coping skills when times get tough. It’s recommended to find things that are healthy for you that you can focus on in lieu of engaging in negative behaviors or habits.

Get Out

If it’s safe to do so for you, Keller recommends getting out of the house. It doesn’t matter if it’s the holidays or not, staying inside all day may not completely beneficial to your mental health. Staying cooped up inside could play a role in why you may be feeling lonely. Some people tend to deal with FOMO (fear of missing out), add a pandemic all year round including the holidays that feeling could skyrocket. If it’s safe to do so, you can go for a walk or even a run. Keller suggests visiting friends, going to church, or even spending some time volunteering. He says it could be helpful to surround yourself with others who may have the same feelings as you so you can help each other not feel as lonely.

Get Help

The Youth Crisis Center has staff standing by and trained to take your call if you or someone else is dealing with a crisis. There is nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to seeking help for your mental health. Whether it’s a family friend or a therapist, it could be beneficial to talk to someone during this difficult time for you.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Surviving a family crisis

A family crisis can occur when the family has to change. According to research, a threat to the family’s organization, structure, or culture can cause a crisis.  There are several types of family crisis: Death of a family member, loss of a job, natural disaster etc. Not all crises are necessarily negative, even a good change may become a crisis, such as the birth of a baby, retirement, children leaving the home, having a new brother or sister, or adoption.  

What deems a crisis is the perception of the family and/or family member to the event, change, or circumstances that are occurring.  According to research, families that are often immobilized by stress often have more arguments, may lack cohesiveness and openness among members, lack family activities or quality time together and lack positive communication/conflict management skills. Children will tend to become more stressed and they may show this by displaying more emotional and behavioral problems such as getting into more trouble at home and or at school, experience more sleep disturbances, have trouble paying attention, become more quiet and withdrawn, and often show more signs of worry and anxiety.

Family therapy can be a wonderful tool for families to engage in work on the family dynamic interaction and system as a whole. Families who engage in therapy can help to strengthen their relationship by learning conflict resolution skills, supportive communication, and gain an understanding of one another’s temperaments and perspectives. Parents can also be given psychoeducation regarding positive child behavioral management techniques as well.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

 

 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships