Get Jags tickets and help YCC through the Give and Go Program

The Youth Crisis Center is part of the Give and Go Program through the Jacksonville Jaguars this year.

The Jaguars have up to 10,000 single-game tickets available to the Youth Crisis Center and a handful of other wonderful, local organizations across the First Coast. These tickets, which you can order below, are at the best price; you can purchase a single game ticket at the nonprofit rate.

When someone buys a ticket, nonprofits like the Youth Crisis Center can earn up to $30 per ticket sold for their organization.

Thank you so much for being so supportive of the Youth Crisis Center! Go Jags!

Dealing with burnout, stress, and your mental health

Just like physical health, everybody has mental health. Someone does not need mental illness to focus on their mental health, just like someone doesn’t need to have a health condition to think about their physical health. One way to keep your mental health in check is to work on managing stress. Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe it is essential to normalize the experience of stress. Stress is unavoidable so being able to accept it will help one cope with it. 

Combat stress

Havey Baer, Lead Residential Therapist, says HALT can be a good acronym to remember for stress triggers.

“When we are Hungry Angry Lonely or Tired, it may make it more difficult to manage everyday stressors and significant life stressors.”

One suggested way on how to combat stress is to take care of your physical body. The Youth Crisis Center recommends getting proper sleep, having an adequate water intake, and eating correctly for ultimate nutrition. Physical exercise could also be a way to combat stress. Therapists also recommend finding or creating a meditative practice that can help the body and mind manage stress.

Why manage stress?

Someone needs to manage their stress because it could have consequences that could be harmful to one’s physical health and mental health. The Youth Crisis Center believes that if one cannot manage their stress, it can negatively impact their mood and relationships with others. It could also create tension in the workplace or school, making it hard to focus and accomplish goals.

I feel great! Why should I worry about my mental health?

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe that it is still vital to maintain mental health practices, even if someone feels good. YCC believes maintaining mental practices helps build coping skills and resilience. YCC claims those skills can help one better manage a stressor or crisis. Baer says improvements can be made by addressing mental health concerns and developing the best versions of themselves.

Overcoming breaking points

Breaking points look different for everyone. First and foremost, know you are not alone. The Youth Crisis Center encourages those suffering to seek professional help or talk with their loved ones. Keep in mind that tough times do not last forever, and these feelings are temporary even though it may seem like it. Experts at YCC believe it is essential to focus on small steps and celebrate small victories throughout the mental health process.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

3 ways to keep your anger in check

 

It’s completely normal to feel angry. It’s a natural emotion that everybody has experienced at least one point in their lives. However, there is no reason to stay mad if you’re feeling that way. Medical experts claim there are long-term physical effects to not managing your anger, such as anxiety, depression, and stroke risks. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say there are ways to manage your anger if you feel that upset; in fact, you can do three things right now to help you manage your anger.

 

Do a countdown

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center recommend counting up or down from 10 or 100. The Youth Crisis Center believes using this method can help you calm down while also slowing down your heart rate.

 

Deep Breaths

This step can immediately follow the first one or be standalone. Experts at YCC claim taking deep breaths can help you re-center yourself. YCC also recommends using breathing exercises as a way of practicing mindfulness. To learn more about mindfulness, click here.

 

Exercise

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center encourage clients to be as active as possible. Going for a walk or a light jog can help you get your limbs moving, and blood pumping, which could ultimately help you keep your mind off whatever is angering you.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Back to School Drive for Youth Crisis Center

A new school year is right around the corner, and the Youth Crisis Center is working hard to make sure their clients are adequately prepared by providing school supplies.

Each year, the Youth Crisis Center tries to gather school supplies for our clients, so they have one less thing to worry about. YCC has clients as young as three years old who are in pre-school to teenagers preparing for their senior year or even college. The Youth Crisis Center also offers a Transitional Living Program for young adults 18-21, who may even be students in local or online colleges.

YCC is calling on our local neighbors to help us ensure that our clients are ready to go for the 2021-2022 school year. The Youth Crisis Center is looking to collect the following items:

  • Pencils
  • Pens
  • Wide-ruled notebooks
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Color Pencils
  • Crayons
  • Highlighters
  • Erasers
  • Binders
  • Composition Notebooks
  • Clorox Wipes

 If you are interested in donating an item, don’t hesitate to contact phicks@ycc.org or dmorgan@ycc.org.

How to help your child if they’re struggling with anxiety

If you’re a parent, it’s hard to watch your child struggle or suffer from anxiety or stress. If you’re not sure what kind of action or approach to take, the Youth Crisis Center says there are various ways to handle the situation by just talking with your child. It may not be able to make all the pain go away, but you could help your child by easing their worries or fears.

Identify that your child is struggling with stress or anxiety

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe it’s essential to make sure you understand your child’s problem. This is an essential step because you may help your child if they are struggling with stress or anxiety differently than if they were getting bullied at school.

Support your child by acknowledging their fears

You probably dealt with a similar issue when you were a child. It is important not to dismiss your child’s fears if you were affected the same way or didn’t share those fears when you were a child. Supporting your child by acknowledging their fears helps them know that you are there for them and simply want to help them.

Seek professional help for your child

As a parent, you can try speaking with your child’s pediatrician, teacher, or school counselor. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe these resources can help guide you in the right direction to getting resources to help your child ultimately.

Talk to your child

You can use this opportunity to offer viable solutions. YCC believes you can talk with your child about things like encouraging them to keep a journal or even cut back on after-school activities.

Use positive terms

When talking with your child, it is important to remember to use positive terms. Parents should use terms like “you are so brave” instead of just passing their child off as shy or anxious for the reasons of their behaviors.

Learn mindfulness

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center say you can use this opportunity to make time for fun and quiet time. You and your child can also develop an exercise regimen of mindful activities that they will use when they are feeling anxious. Click here for mindfulness tips for children.

 

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control, or problem-solving skills.

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

Your Child and Anxiety

Everybody deals with anxiety differently. According to Healthline, “anxiety is your body’s natural response to stress.”  Stress is a part of everyday life. Some people encounter it at one point whether it’s the first day of school, public speaking, or finally landing a job interview; stress happens and how people deal with it varies. However, while stress is a part of everyday life, it is not supposed to dictate your life. Experts at Healthline claim “if feelings of anxiety are extreme, last longer than six months, and interfering with your life, you may have an anxiety disorder.”

The CDC says children also have fears and worries. Regardless of how young they are, children sometimes find themselves feeling sad and hopeless every now and then.  It is a part of life and some of those feelings are normal for kids.  However, the CDC believes “persistent or extreme forms of fear and sadness could be due to anxiety or depression.”  

 

Your child and anxiety

Parents never want to see their child suffer or be in pain. You may feel that it is your duty as a parent to help your child work through what’s bothering them. It can be easier to figure out why your child is crying if you see them with a scraped knee or if they accidentally touched the stove while it was hot. It may not be as easy to figure out what’s going on mentally and causing your child stress or anxiety.

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe there are three different categories parents should pay attention to if they suspect their child may be struggling with stress or anxiety.

Thinking symptoms

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center encourage you to really pay attention to what your child says about their thoughts. Some things to look out for is if your child often talks about their mind racing or the fact they find it hard to think straight. Therapists also recommend talking with your child’s instructors if they’re in school to see if your child’s concentration is not where it used to be or if they have difficulties with starting assignments.

Emotional symptoms

Parents should also monitor their child’s behavior and how they are reacting to things around them. You can use this opportunity to see if your child is coming off as withdrawn and if they tend to isolate themselves. You can also try talking to your kids, see if they’re having obsessive thoughts they can’t seem to shake or they are struggling with low self-esteem.

Physical symptoms

As mentioned earlier, physical symptoms are a bit easier to detect than the symptoms kids are dealing with mentally. YCC therapists claim that children undergoing stress and anxiety may have sore muscles. Children may also use the bathroom more frequently. YCC suggests to parents that they should pay attention to their children’s eating and sleeping habits. Hoarding food or having problems sleeping could also be indicators of stress for your child.

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control, or problem-solving skills. 

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

Mindfulness: How to get your child involved

 

Mindfulness is a subject addressed often at the Youth Crisis Center. Experts at YCC believe that mindfulness is having awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgement on ourselves. YCC wants to remind everyone that practicing mindfulness doesn’t cost anything. You will be able to practice anywhere as long as you have the time and space for it. This includes youth. Therapist at YCC encourages parents to find opportunities to talk about mindfulness with their children and how they used it today.

Getting Youth Involved

Young people should absolutely consider practicing mindfulness. Research shows that practicing mindfulness has been shown to improve attention and reduce stress.  Practicing mindfulness could also improve your ability to regulate emotions and feel compassion along with empathy.  Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe that learning how to gain and utilize self-awareness is such a valuable skill that will stick with children for the remainder of their lives. They believe self-awareness and healthy coping could have a positive impact on your mood, self-esteem, social interactions, your relationship with others, and your quality of life.

Therapists recommend practicing mindfulness as a family. They suggest it could be a great way to connect with one another. It is advised to introduce exercises when things are calm and  your child is already in a good space. It is recommended you keep the time short, especially if your child is on the younger side. It’s best to let them set the pace and once they’re done…don’t push it.

For activities, you can start with a walk or breathing exercises with your child. Once you have completed that activity, you can shift your focus to the senses. You can talk about what you saw while on the walk, the sounds, and the smells.

Mindfulness as an Adult vs Youth

Children and adults face different challenges in today’s society, and therefore children and adults may practice mindfulness in varying ways and for varying reasons. An adult may use mindfulness techniques to help them be a better leader, to help them feel better about themselves and learn gratitude, or to help them be a more effective/empathetic/well rounded person in general. Youth could use mindfulness to help alleviate behavioral and emotion regulation problems in the classroom, or to assist in coping with depression or anxiety.

 

 

Mindfulness is a subject addressed often at the Youth Crisis Center. Experts at YCC believe that mindfulness is having awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgement on ourselves. YCC wants to remind everyone that practicing mindfulness doesn’t cost anything. You will be able to practice anywhere as long as you have the time and space for it. This includes youth. Therapist at YCC encourages parents to find opportunities to talk about mindfulness with their children and how they used it today.

Getting Youth Involved

Young people should absolutely consider practicing mindfulness. Research shows that practicing mindfulness has been shown to improve attention and reduce stress.  Practicing mindfulness could also improve your ability to regulate emotions and feel compassion along with empathy.  Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe that learning how to gain and utilize self-awareness is such a valuable skill that will stick with children for the remainder of their lives. They believe self-awareness and healthy coping could have a positive impact on your mood, self-esteem, social interactions, your relationship with others, and your quality of life.

Therapists recommend practicing mindfulness as a family. They suggest it could be a great way to connect with one another. It is advised to introduce exercises when things are calm and your child is already in a good space. It is recommended you keep the time short, especially if your child is on the younger side. It’s best to let them set the pace and once they’re done…don’t push it.

For activities, you can start with a walk or breathing exercises with your child. Once you have completed that activity, you can shift your focus to the senses. You can talk about what you saw while on the walk, the sounds, and the smells.

Mindfulness as an Adult vs Youth

Children and adults face different challenges in today’s society, and therefore children and adults may practice mindfulness in varying ways and for varying reasons. An adult may use mindfulness techniques to help them be a better leader, to help them feel better about themselves and learn gratitude, or to help them be a more effective/empathetic/well rounded person in general. Youth could use mindfulness to help alleviate behavioral and emotion regulation problems in the classroom, or to assist in coping with depression or anxiety.

 

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control or problem-solving skills. 

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

Three ways you can start practicing mindfulness today

There is no universally recognized definition of mindfulness; however, there are some consistent key concepts. Mindfulness is focusing one’s attention on our present condition. It is gaining awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and sensations we experience in the here-and-now, rather than on past adversity or future anxieties. According to therapists at the Youth Crisis Center, mindfulness is having an awareness of our physical, mental, and emotional condition without assigning judgment on ourselves.

YCC therapists believe someone can begin their mindfulness journey by utilizing grounding strategies from three categories: mental, physical, and soothing.

 

Mental 

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center recommend that you try describing what’s around you. It is advised to spend a few minutes taking in your surroundings and noting what you see. Therapists encourage using all five senses during their exercise.

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center also suggest that you do something that brings you joy or makes you laugh. You can do this by watching your favorite TV show, movie or even scrolling through clips on social media.

 

Physical 

It is recommended to try to pick up or touch things near you. YCC wants you to ask yourself questions about the item, such as whether it is soft or hard or cool to touch. Therapists want you to focus on the texture and the color of each item. They also challenge you to tap into your creativity by naming specific colors like crimson or lavender instead of red and purple.

Therapists also want you to focus on your breathing. If that is something you find difficult to start, they suggest slowly inhaling and then exhaling. Saying or thinking “in” and “out” with each breath could also be beneficial. YCC encourages you to feel each breath filling your lungs and note how it feels to push it back out.

 

Soothing

When it comes to soothing, it is recommended you practice self-kindness during your mindfulness practice. You can use self-affirmations that make you feel good and powerful.

You can also visualize your favorite place. It’s recommended that you use your senses during this exercise. Close your eyes and visualize one of your favorite places to be. Think or say out loud the colors you see, the sounds you hear, or the smells coming to mind.

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Taking care of your mental health at work, avoiding burnout

It can be easy for one to get caught up in work. Someone could find themselves so wrapped up in their work that they probably miss lunch, stay late, or even bring their work home. Sometimes it happens to the best of us, but it could lead to workplace burnout when it happens consistently.

What is workplace burnout?

 

According to Mayo Clinic, “job burnout is a special type of work-related stress.”  Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe racing thoughts, an inability to focus, headaches, or even agitation could be stress indicators. The Mayo Clinic even suggests you asking yourself several questions:

 

  • Have you become irritable or impatient with co-workers, customers, or clients?
  • Do you have a hard time concentrating?
  • Do you drag yourself to work and have trouble getting started?

 

Similar to your physical health at work, there are ways you can take care of your mental health while at your office. Some people enjoy standing up at their desks or taking frequent walks to keep their body for their physical health. For your mental health, taking small breaks that do not fully distract you from your work and stepping away from your desk to take a quick walk could be beneficial. Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe this is just one of the many ways you can take care of yourself and avoid burnout while on the job.

 

Prioritize

Experts at the Youth Crisis Center believe prioritizing can be beneficial. Human Resources Manager Kristen Wendle recommends communicating with your supervisor about setting realistic deadlines. She also suggests setting a to-do list to keep organized where you can map out what needs to get accomplished when it’s due and how you plan to achieve the task. If you’re able to prioritize your tasks, it could make it easier for you so you’re not stressing over many different projects all due at one time.

 

Personal Time 

If you have some PTO saved up, it is recommended that you use it when you need it. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center encourage workers to take days off even when they’re not sick or have an appointment. Taking mental health days is just as important as staying home from work because you’re sick. Human Resources Manager Kristen Wendle says, “if everyone is going 100 mph, people aren’t putting enough focus on themselves to take a breath, relax, and address anything that is going on internally.” Taking time off from work could not only help someone bring down stress, but it could also help them in the long run at work by being able to spend time away from it to recharge.

 

Leave Work at Work

This tip goes well with the previous ones. You don’t want to bring work home unless you have to. If you’re constantly bringing work home, it could blur the lines between the office and your personal space. During the work-from-home orders, therapists recommended having a set space at your home dedicated to work. It would be best if you didn’t focus on work when you’re outside of that space or focus on home while you’re there. Having boundaries can be very helpful in this case, so focus on work while doing work things free of distractions and interruptions. However, if you don’t have boundaries and cannot create a space for work at your home, you may find it constantly on your mind or worrying tasks that can wait until the next time you’re working. This could put a strain on mental health, but it could also impact relationships because it may keep you away from your loved ones.

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington DC. Throughout the past 45 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Wine tasting event benefitting the Youth Crisis Center

If you’re a wine lover, you’re going to like this. 

The Youth Crisis Center and ONEHOPE Wine are teaming up for a fundraiser to help YCC continue with its mission to build a healthier community by empowering young people and families to rise above adversity. 

ONEHOPE Wine will be donating 10% of its sales to the Youth Crisis Center. You can order your wine by using this link: https://www.onehopewine.com/event/101876