How the Youth Crisis Center is helping young adults in Northeast Florida

 

Just because the word Youth is in our name does not mean we are only limited to helping children. The Youth Crisis Center offers counseling services to people of all ages. We provide residential services as well. Nearly a dozen young adults in Northeast Florida call YCC home, thanks to our Transitional Living Programs in Clay and Duval counties.

 

Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program 

Our Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program offers residential services for young adults 18-21 in Northeast Florida. Touchstone is not a “one size fits all” program; YCC considers each resident’s individual needs. Our goal is always the same for each client: to help them successfully transition into a responsible, independent young adult.

Staff at YCC work with Touchstone clients regularly through counseling services or just checking in on them to ensure everything is okay. Our clients are encouraged to have a job or be in school during their stay to help them achieve independence. In some cases, our clients are both working and going to school. If a client is not working or in school, we help connect them to programs and additional resources that could lead to employment. Our staff will also drive clients to job interviews and fairs if needed.

 

Touchstone Village provides each resident with:

  • Rental of either an individual apartment (Duval County) or a shared living space (Moosehaven Clay County) for a nominal fee 
  • Life skills training
  • Education planning
  • Career development
  • Vocational training
  • Counseling
  • Financial literacy
  • Social & personal skills training
  • Life coaching
  • Case management

To learn more and to talk to someone about the Touchstone Village Transitional Living Program, click here. 

 

House of Hope

The House of Hope is the latest addition to the list of programs at the Youth Crisis Center. The House of Hope serves as an emergency shelter for young adults 18-24 years old. 

During their stay, staff will help residents with the following:

 

– Life skills training – Connection for stable and permanent housing

– Mental health counseling – Academic monitoring and support

– Access to medical care – Career development training

 

The House of Hope includes nine rooms hosting one bed each, a full kitchen, dining hall, private counseling room, life skills training space, sanctuary garden, and communal gathering space. Each room of the House of Hope is furnished and decorated, all thanks to donors. 

The House of Hope is a gender-neutral emergency crisis shelter, with the specific services targeted to homeless young adults. That model is based on the programs YCC already offers on campus, like the Residential Crisis Care Program, which serves minors, and the long-term housing program called Touchstone Village, surviving 18-21-year-olds.

To learn more about or to talk to someone about the House of Hope, click here. 

 

If you know of a young adult between the ages of 18 – 21 who is struggling to become self-reliant and independent, YCC can provide transitional living services through our Touchstone Village program. Click to learn more about Touchstone Village and the 5 Skills Young Adults Need to Successfully Live Independently

Download our free ebook!

5 Key Skills Young Adults Need to Successfully Live Independently

Getting through the holidays while feeling lonely

The holiday season can mean a lot of things to different people. Some may think about joy, time with the family, and just happiness in general. Others may not have such a positive experience with the holidays. Both feelings are valid and are okay for someone to have. If someone has a positive experience with the holidays and tends to feel great during this time of the year, then they may not have a hard of a time as others who tend to feel lonely during these days.

On top of the general feeling of being lonely, our country is still pushing through a pandemic. The pandemic could be preventing families from gathering like they used to. There are video calls, zooms, and other alternatives it still may not be enough for those who cannot physically be with their loved ones.

Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center believe there are ways to get through the last hump of this holiday season even if you’re feeling lonely.

Stay Busy

Carl Keller, a Family Link Therapist says it’s best to stay busy during this time. This necessarily doesn’t mean to keep yourself busy by adding more work to your plate. You can pick up a new hobby, exercise, or do something else that keeps you busy and makes you happy. Keeping yourself busy could help you with keeping your mind off of negative thoughts. These activities could also serve as healthy coping skills when times get tough. It’s recommended to find things that are healthy for you that you can focus on in lieu of engaging in negative behaviors or habits.

Get Out

If it’s safe to do so for you, Keller recommends getting out of the house. It doesn’t matter if it’s the holidays or not, staying inside all day may not completely beneficial to your mental health. Staying cooped up inside could play a role in why you may be feeling lonely. Some people tend to deal with FOMO (fear of missing out), add a pandemic all year round including the holidays that feeling could skyrocket. If it’s safe to do so, you can go for a walk or even a run. Keller suggests visiting friends, going to church, or even spending some time volunteering. He says it could be helpful to surround yourself with others who may have the same feelings as you so you can help each other not feel as lonely.

Get Help

The Youth Crisis Center has staff standing by and trained to take your call if you or someone else is dealing with a crisis. There is nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to seeking help for your mental health. Whether it’s a family friend or a therapist, it could be beneficial to talk to someone during this difficult time for you.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Surviving a family crisis

A family crisis can occur when the family has to change. According to research, a threat to the family’s organization, structure, or culture can cause a crisis.  There are several types of family crisis: Death of a family member, loss of a job, natural disaster etc. Not all crises are necessarily negative, even a good change may become a crisis, such as the birth of a baby, retirement, children leaving the home, having a new brother or sister, or adoption.  

What deems a crisis is the perception of the family and/or family member to the event, change, or circumstances that are occurring.  According to research, families that are often immobilized by stress often have more arguments, may lack cohesiveness and openness among members, lack family activities or quality time together and lack positive communication/conflict management skills. Children will tend to become more stressed and they may show this by displaying more emotional and behavioral problems such as getting into more trouble at home and or at school, experience more sleep disturbances, have trouble paying attention, become more quiet and withdrawn, and often show more signs of worry and anxiety.

Family therapy can be a wonderful tool for families to engage in work on the family dynamic interaction and system as a whole. Families who engage in therapy can help to strengthen their relationship by learning conflict resolution skills, supportive communication, and gain an understanding of one another’s temperaments and perspectives. Parents can also be given psychoeducation regarding positive child behavioral management techniques as well.

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

 

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

 

 

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Communication in the Family

How can parents help their kids feel comfortable talking to them?

  • One of the greatest ways a can parent help their kid open up communication with them is through learning and nailing the art of validation. The dictionary defines validation as “the recognition or affirmation that a person, their feelings, or opinions are valid or worthwhile.” Validation kindly communicates that you want and are trying to “get” them or their perspective and that their thoughts and feelings are understandable. Reflecting back to your child in your own words a summary or a paraphrase of what they have communicated is a great way of demonstrating that you are listening. It is also an opportunity for the child or teen to clarify what they are saying. Validation is experienced through eye contact, empathy, attentiveness, and a genuine heart to understand rather than get a point across.
  • Your child or teen has a deep and immeasurable need to be known in this way. Often times fear or need for control will hijack such conversations and a parent will feel pressure to use the moment to get information, solve a problem, or lecture to instill a lesson or character trait. To the Youth, this feels like a selfish exchange on part of the parent and in many ways it is. A lecture is actually meeting the parent’s need at that moment and not the child’s, even though this usually comes from a place of good intention. The more you practice validation, the more your sense of when your child needs validation more than anything else will become more apparent. Therapists are also happy and ready to help you learn this skill if you need some help!

How to be open with your parents.

Kids, if you would like to be more open with your parents and feel more heard on things that are super important to you or sensitive in nature, sometimes it is helpful to set up a conversation for success by choosing a good time as much as possible and stating your need. For example, “Dad, I want to talk to you about something important and I need you to please (listen well, not interrupt, sit and talk in my room for a bit, etc). This gives your parent a chance to give feedback about the timing and it alerts them about the importance of the conversation. Sometimes it is really helpful to be respectfully blunt in communication but do make sure to appreciate the difference between being direct about an emotional need vs being demanding.

Benefits of Clear Communication

Clear and direct speaking and listening can prevent an untold number of painful and unnecessary conflicts and misunderstandings. Validation and directness in communication build mutual understanding, respect, trust, and ultimately deeper bonding and love between family members.

YCC’s Family Link Program 

The Family Link program provides professional and compassionate short-term, outpatient counseling services to families with children ages 6-17 who are experiencing concerns that could disrupt the health and stability of the family. These services are available at no cost to residents of Baker, Clay, Duval, St. Johns, and Nassau counties through appointments at the child’s school or other community locations. Click to learn more about Family Link and the 5 Ways to Strengthen Your Family. All Family Link counseling sessions are confidential. To learn more about services, please call (904) 720-0007.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

You don’t have to run away, talk to someone

For some youth, running away may seem like the only option and the best case scenario when things start to go south at home. Therapists at the Youth Crisis Center want all youth or anyone who might be running away from home or their problems to know that it’s not worth it. There are so many other options that could help you. At the Youth Crisis Center, we have staff ready for your calls and a wide range of therapists willing to help you work through some of the curveballs life throws at us sometimes.

 

It’s not worth it

 

Family Link Therapist Quandalyn Prince, MSW says her first advice she would give to a child who is running away is “don’t do it.”

“It’s not worth it. There are other alternatives besides running away and leaving a home that you are safe in versus going out into the real world and experiencing things you may not be used to.”

Prince wants to warn youth that there are people out there who go out of their way to take advantage of and prey on children. She also warns about sex trafficking, access to drugs, and other things that could lead to a negative impact on your life.

 

Talk to someone

Prince believes running away, especially as a youth, could lead to consequences you may not have thought about. Instead, she strongly encourages you to go talk to someone whether that is a parent, a friend, an adult you trust, or even a counselor.

 

“Urge them to hear what you have to say about running away because there are options out there.”

 

Prince says there could be a positive outcome from talking to a therapist. By speaking with someone, you could uncover a deeper reason why you want to run away. Therapy can also help you figure out coping skills and techniques so you’re able to tackle some of the speed bumps of life that come your way.

 

“Because once you run away, you’re no longer the same. You can experience so many things that can impact your future.”

 

About YCC’s Residential Crisis Care Program 

Referred by family members, community resources, schools, law enforcement, and YCC outreach, these youth have either run away or are at risk of running away, been locked out of their homes, are habitually truant from school, or have exhibited ungovernable behavior. Our program is here to provide a safety net to young people and their families when they need it most.

 

 Our residential therapists work with youth and their families to address the immediate crisis and help provide long-term solutions to handle future concerns once the child or teen returns home. Our goal is to reunite families by providing assistance and support with a clear plan for continued stabilization.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

3 things you can do now to get more involved in your child’s life

Have you ever wondered how you can get more involved in your child’s life? Perhaps you may have wondered if parental involvement is important for children?

No matter what your reason is, Family Link Therapist Sidney Vernon, MSW, has listed a few suggestions below on how you can become more involved in your child’s life. 

How to get more involved in your child’s life:

1. Create routines.

Routines help children to feel safe and provide structure to their lives. To get more involved in your child’s life, consider making new family routines. Some examples include: try to have a family dinner at least three times a week, start a weekly family game night, have a monthly family movie night, or have a family outing

2. Do a daily “check-in.”

To be more involved in your child’s life, try to build a routine of doing a daily “check-in” with your child. Come up with questions to ask your child during your daily check-in time like what was your favorite part of your day, how did you feel today, etc. Some good times to complete a daily check-in are in the car on the way home from school, on the walk home from the bus stop, bedtime, or any other time of day that you are and your child are typically already together.

3. Communication is key!

Communicating with your child is a great way for you to be more involved in their life. Depending on the age of the child, communication looks very different. Young children communicate through play and behaviors. Older children can communicate more through having conversations. If your older child does not feel comfortable talking, you can try writing letters back and forth.

Why to be more involved in your child’s life/ Some benefits may include:

  • Improved attachment / relationship
  • Builds trust
  • Increases your child’s self-esteem
  • Increases your child’s self-confidence
  • May decrease your child’s bad behaviors
  • May increase your child’s school performance

YCC’s Family Link Program

The Family Link program provides professional and compassionate short-term, outpatient counseling services to families with children ages 6-17 who are experiencing concerns that could disrupt the health and stability of the family. These services are available at no cost to residents of Baker, Clay, Duval, St. Johns and Nassau counties through appointments at the child’s school or other community locations. Click to learn more about Family Link and the 5 Ways to Strengthen Your Family. All Family Link counseling sessions are confidential. To learn more about services, please call (904) 720-0007.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Addressing Anger

It is rare to find someone who is happy all the time. Getting mad is just as common as feeling sad, joyful, jealous, and scared or any other emotion. As human beings, we cycle through these emotions and that’s okay; it’s normal. How we feel and respond to things plays a part in what makes us unique. However, it is wise to  never let one emotion rule your life. You take the happy times with the sad. Certain conversations with people can make you angry while some situations can make you scared. Your feelings are valid. However, while your emotions such as getting angry is okay, how you react to your anger is what makes a difference.

Talking to your kids about anger

Outpatient Therapist Ron Bertie suggests letting your child know that anger is normal, but you want to work with them on how they react to that anger. He wants you to help your child come up with positive outlets. This can be something like painting, drawing, or another type of creative outlet. If their child prefers something more on the physical side, it can be dancing, running, or working out. Bertie suggests these kinds of coping mechanisms should already be in place before an incident takes place. He advises talking to your kids about controlling their anger when they’re already angry may not be as effective.

Triggers

Whether it is your child or yourself, Bertie recommends thinking and talking about your triggers. He says when you have identified possible triggers, you can then focus on how you react to that particular trigger. According to Bertie, a way to deal with your triggers better or even overcome is to change your perception of them by being more empathetic, setting boundaries, or if it’s a person – talking to them.

Dealing with anger as an adult

Bertie says his advice would not differ too much when it comes to talking to kids or an adult about their anger. The reason for that is because Bertie explains some issues are derived from childhood. Bertie recommends for adults to learn how to heal from old scars. He also wants adults to evaluate the outcome of their outburst. Once they have completed those steps, Bertie says it will be time to find innate reasons for change.

About SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control or problem-solving skills. 

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

How to work with your kids to tackle bullying

It’s hard to run into anybody nowadays who has not been affected by bullying. Bullying can be defined as someone who is being hurt by either words or actions on purpose more than once. It can cause physical pain or even emotional pain. According to StopBullying.gov, some bullying can fall into criminal categories, such as harassment, hazing, or assault. Bullying isn’t a new concept as it has been around for generations, it even changes with each generation as today’s youth have dealt with bullying through social media.

The effects of bullying on mental health

Youth who are bullied over time are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem compared to their peers who have not experienced it, research suggests. It could be difficult for one to determine the exact effect bullying has on someone because we all experience and cope with things differently. That same study also shows that youth who bully others over time are at higher risk for more intense anti-social behaviors like problems at school, substance use, and aggressive behavior.

Duval Charter School Therapist, Clarissa Benitez, MSW claims kids cans often times feel embarrassed after experiencing bullying and will worry that their parents will be upset if they found out. She also says youth may feel like it is their fault and reaching out for help will only cause the bullying to get worse.

How parents can get involved

It is always encouraged for parents to check in with their children and look for any kind of warning signs. Parents should pay attention to things such as whether their child is getting into physical or verbal fights at school. Stop Bullying also says another warning sign could be your child blaming others for their problems.

Benitez suggests to parents to listen calmly and offer comfort while listening to their kids talk about their problems. She says it is vital you offer support during this time. Benitez does admit, for some parents it can be tempting to tell your child to fight back. She says this feeling is common because parents are angry that their child is suffering.

“Let your child know the importance of standing up for themselves by telling someone: a teacher, a parent, or any trusted adult.”

Benitez recommends coming up with a plan with your child on how they can respond to the situation and most importantly, reassure them that you will figure it out. Some other strategies include teaching your child to walk away and telling the bully to stop; however, Benitez says it is important to make sure that your child feels safe and confident enough to do that. She also encourages coming up with a buddy system so your child is never alone and has a friend with them. It is recommended by Benitez to talk to your child’s school about the bullying.

“Don’t be afraid to ask the school what their policies are on bullying prevention and the actions taken if a child is being bullied.”

 

What if my child is the bully?

Benitez says it is important for parents to help their children understand that their actions are hurting others. She goes on to explain that parents need to use this opportunity to tell their child that everyone deserves respect, and that could start with setting examples at home. She recommends modeling nonviolent behaviors for your child and to encourage them from talking to someone. According to Benitez, parents must take this situation seriously and do not pass it off as ‘just a phase.’ She says that being a bully can have long-lasting effects on a child that can lead to aggressive behaviors. Benitez says if the bullying does not stop for your child, seek a mental health counselor.

About the SNAP® at the Youth Crisis Center

YCC offers a program called SNAP®, which stands for STOP NOW AND PLAN. This is an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral model powered by the minds at Child Development Institute (CDI). SNAP® can help children, ages 6-11, and their parents learn how to effectively manage their emotions and ‘keep problems small.’ We know that because small problems can quickly turn bigger or worsening problems if a child or their parent doesn’t have effective emotion regulation, self-control, or problem-solving skills. 

 

Download our free ebook!

 Six Signs That Your Child May Have Behavioral Issues or Concerns

The importance of therapy

What is therapy and can it really help people? 

Therapy is designed to assist someone who may be dealing with life stressors that can affect their outlook on life. You can see a mental health profession for a multitude of problems such as anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), trauma, low self-esteem, anger, grief/loss just to name a few. Therapy allows you to talk openly with an unbiased mental health profession. As a mental health profession, we assist our clients in uncovering strengths about themselves and to help them learn new skills in life so they can deal with situations that may impact their life. Therapy not only helps you to deal with what is going on internally but it can boost your physical health as well.

Can therapy be for one person or can the whole family participate? 

Therapy is designed for the individual and their family. Individual therapy is one-on-one and it tackles your needs as a person so that you can handle any obstacles that you may face daily. Family therapy allows for family members to come together and work on any conflict and lack of communication there is amongst one another. At Youth Crisis Center we not only provide individual therapy but strive to have family therapy as well to help address specific issues or concerns they may have.

Is therapy only for someone who is mentally ill? Can therapy tackle more than one issue?

Therapy is not just for people who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. Everyone needs a positive support system in their life and by talking to a mental health professional regardless of if you have a mental illness or not, it can give you a new perspective on how to deal with certain situations in your life. Therapy can tackle as many issues as you would like to work on. At Youth Crisis Center, our treatment plans are personalized to meet the needs of our patients and there are times where they have more than one issue they would like to work on.

 

YCC’s Family Link Program 

The Family Link program provides professional and compassionate short-term, outpatient counseling services to families with children ages 6-17 who are experiencing concerns that could disrupt the health and stability of the family. These services are available at no cost to residents of Baker, Clay, Duval, St. Johns, and Nassau counties through appointments at the child’s school or other community locations. Click to learn more about Family Link and the 5 Ways to Strengthen Your Family. All Family Link counseling sessions are confidential. To learn more about services, please call (904) 720-0007.

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships

Mindfulness for beginners: what is it and how to practice

Let’s start by defining ‘mindfulness,’ according to Headspace, mindfulness is the quality of being present and fully engaged with whatever we are doing at the moment. Amanda Marker, a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and the Lead Outpatient Therapist at the Youth Crisis Center says mindfulness has been found to be a key element in stress reduction and overall happiness. Marker explains there are two key elements of mindfulness: focusing your attention on the present moment and accepting it without judgment.

 

Practicing Mindfulness

According to Marker, mindfulness starts with being aware of our bodies. She goes on to say that very act can be calming.

“You don’t need to buy anything. You can practice anywhere – all you need is a little time and space.”

Marker understands that it can be incredibly challenging to quiet the mind, but she acknowledges that is not the goal during this practice. She says when it comes to practicing mindfulness, all you’re trying to do is pay attention to the present moment, without judgment. Marker says your mind will wander during this practice. You might start to think about your to-do list, the laundry you forgot in the dryer, or even a conversation you had with someone yesterday. Marker explains that is normal and part of human nature. She says when practicing mindfulness, try to not judge yourself for whatever thoughts pop up. Instead, she wants you to focus on your breathing and return your attention to the present moment.

“Be kind to your wandering mind. Don’t judge yourself or obsess over the content of the thoughts you find yourself lost in. Just come back.”

Basic Mindfulness Meditation 

The first thing Marker suggests when it comes to your practice is to take a seat. She wants you to find a place to sit that feels calm and quiet to you. She recommends setting a time limit, especially if you’re new to the practice. Once you’re sitting down, it will be time to focus on your breathing. Marker wants you to use this time to allow your thoughts to come and go without judgment. She also wants you to focus on your breath or even a mantra you may have set at the beginning of the day or your practice.

Marker encourages using your senses during your practice. She wants clients to focus on what they see, smell, taste, or even feel. In fact, she recommends you saying them aloud before letting those thoughts and senses go. She also invites clients to allow their emotions to be present during this practice. Similar to the senses, you can describe aloud what you are feeling.

 

The Benefits of Practicing Mindfulness

In an article published by Harvard Medical School, mindfulness can bring improvements in well-being. Amanda Marker, LMHC believes being mindful makes it easier to enjoy the positive movements in life as they happen and can help you become fully engaged in activities. Another benefit is being less likely to get caught up in worries about the future or regrets over the past. Mindfulness can also help with improving your mental health and relieve stress.

Introducing Your Child to Mindfulness 

Marker wants parents to talk with their kids about mindfulness.

“When the opportunity presents itself, talk about how you used mindfulness during your day.”

She says children learn by seeing what the adults in their lives do, so she encourages being open about how you practice mindfulness. Marker suggests introducing exercises when things are calm and your child is in a good space. She explains during this time would be ideal to try mindfulness activities as a family, as it could be a great way to connect one another. Marker does warn to keep the time short, especially if your child is on the younger side. She also wants you to let the child set the pace. If they’re done, don’t push it.

For activities, you can start with a walk or breathing exercises with your child. Once you have completed that activity, you can shift your focus to the senses. Marker suggests activities like listening mindfully, eating a treat mindfully, or taking another walk using all of your senses. For example, have your child hold a raisin. Marker instructs having your child notice the color, texture, shape, size, smell, weight, and taste of it for one minute.

 

Youth Crisis Center’s Outpatient Behavioral Health Program

The Youth Crisis Center was founded in 1974 as Florida’s first run-away program and has grown to be one of the largest and best-known providers of services for youth and families. Nationally recognized as setting a standard in youth services, YCC has been ranked as one of the top five programs in the United States by the Youth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. Throughout the past 46 years, YCC has helped thousands of youth and their families overcome adversity and build stronger relationships. 

One of the several programs, YCC offers is Outpatient Behavioral Health. This program provides comprehensive mental health and psychiatric care to kids as young as three and their families. Parents may also receive individual and family counseling regardless if their child is a client at YCC.

 

Download our FREE ebook!

5 Ways to Improve Your Interpersonal Relationships